Posted 3 months ago

His acting as Bernie in “Weekend at Bernie’s”  was spot-on- wouldn’t you agree? The man inspired a dance craze and now you can learn from the master right here in Austin.

Posted 6 months ago

My dad found this petrified bat stuck between the screen of one of the windows of my new apartment. It’s so gross-it’s funny.

Posted 7 months ago

Supposedly the band Polaris was actually a “fake band” made for the Adventures of Pete & Pete and was actually just made up of members of Miracle Legion. How am I just finding this out!?


Mark Mulcahy was the lead singer for Miracle Legion/Polaris, and he just came out with a new record. I love his vocals and lyrics. See more on his new album here:

http://www.npr.org/2013/09/10/221089642/mark-mulcahy-on-world-cafe

Posted 1 year ago

Korea House

Posted 1 year ago

Funniest Scene from Wanderlust

Just finished watching Wanderlust directed by David Wain. Probably haven’t laughed that hard since watching Stella Shorts

Posted 1 year ago

All that Heaven Allows (1955) and Far From Heaven (2002)

One is based on the other, and they are both so good. The flannel kills me.

Posted 1 year ago
I started watching Switched at Birth recently. It is cheesy but strangely addicting and intriguing. I went looking for a validation to watching this ABC Family sitcom and found this review in the New Yorker. One of the girls is deaf and 

perhaps most striking is the show’s approach to the aesthetics of deafness. Conversations among deaf characters are silent, with signing and subtitles. While series like “The West Wing” and “The L Word,” which also included deaf actors (well, Marlee Matlin), contrived ways to have hearing characters translate each scene, in “Switched at Birth” there is often no one to do the translation. Some characters refuse to speak; hearing characters are often bad at signing. During signed dialogue we hear nothing but a trickling fountain in the background, or the sounds of distant crowds. The result is a show that can’t be skimmed: in extended scenes among deaf characters, whole minutes elapse, submerging the audience in a world that feels intimate and alive, rich with grimaces, grins, and other physical nuances we’d usually ignore.

I started watching Switched at Birth recently. It is cheesy but strangely addicting and intriguing. I went looking for a validation to watching this ABC Family sitcom and found this review in the New Yorker. One of the girls is deaf and

perhaps most striking is the show’s approach to the aesthetics of deafness. Conversations among deaf characters are silent, with signing and subtitles. While series like “The West Wing” and “The L Word,” which also included deaf actors (well, Marlee Matlin), contrived ways to have hearing characters translate each scene, in “Switched at Birth” there is often no one to do the translation. Some characters refuse to speak; hearing characters are often bad at signing. During signed dialogue we hear nothing but a trickling fountain in the background, or the sounds of distant crowds. The result is a show that can’t be skimmed: in extended scenes among deaf characters, whole minutes elapse, submerging the audience in a world that feels intimate and alive, rich with grimaces, grins, and other physical nuances we’d usually ignore.



Posted 1 year ago

My next goal at Halfprice is to find Hellraiser on VHS. Preferably the first two.

Posted 1 year ago
Big fat “water bear”!

Big fat “water bear”!

Posted 1 year ago

How Wes Anderson Soundtracks His Movies

Randall Poster, musical supervisor for many Wes Anderson films, interviewed on Fresh Air (NPR).

If you weren’t lucky enough to catch this on the radio last week, here it is.

: ]